Candidate Neural Network Architecture : PredNet

While I sketched out a provisional idea of how I reckoned the network could look, I’m doing what I can to avoid reinventing the wheel. As it happens there’s a Deep Learning problem with implemented solutions that I believe is close enough to the earthquake prediction problem to make a good starting point : predicting the next frame(s) in a video. You train the network on a load of sample video data, then at runtime give it a short sequence and let it figure out what happens next.

This may seem a bit random, but I think I have good justification. The kind of videos people have been working with are things like human movement or motion of a car. (Well, I’ve seen one notable, fun, exception : Adversarial Video Generation is applied to the activities of Mrs. Pac-Man). In other words, a projection of objects obeying what is essentially Newtonian physics. Presumably seismic events follow the same kind of model. As mention in my last post, I’m currently planning on using online data that places seismic events on a map – providing the following: event time, latitude, longitude, depth and magnitude. The video prediction nets generally operate over time on x, y with R, G, B for colour. Quite a similar shape of data.

So I had a little trawl of what was out there.  There are a surprisingly wide variety of strategies, but one in particular caught my eye : PredNet. This is described in the paper Deep Predictive Coding Networks for Video Prediction and Unsupervised Learning (William Lotter, Gabriel Kreiman & David Cox from Harvard) and has supporting code etc. on GitHub. Several things about it appealed to me. It’s quite an elegant conceptual structure, which translates in practice into a mix of convnets/RNNs, not too far from what I anticipated needing for this application. This (from the paper) might give you an idea:

prednet-block

Another plus from my point of view was that the demo code is written using Keras on Tensorflow, exactly what I was intending to use.

Yesterday I had a go at getting it running.  Right away I hit a snag: I’ve got this laptop set up for Tensorflow etc. on Python 3, but the code uses hickle.py, which uses Python 2. I didn’t want to risk messing up my current setup (took ages to get working) so had a go at setting up a Docker container – Tensorflow has an image. Day-long story short, something wasn’t quite right. I suspect the issues I had related to nvidia-docker, needed to run on GPUs.

Earlier today I decided to have a look at what would be needed to get the PredNet code Python3-friendly. Running kitti-train.py (Kitti is the demo data set) led straight to an error in hickle.py. Nothing to lose, had a look. “Hickle is a HDF5 based clone of Pickle, with a twist. Instead of serializing to a pickle file, Hickle dumps to a HDF5 file.“. There is a note saying there’s Python3 support in progress, but the cause of the error turned out to be –

if isinstance(f, file):

file isn’t a thing in Python3. But kitti-train.py was only passing a filename to this, via data-utils.py, so I just commented out the lines associated with the isinstance. (I guess I should fix it properly, feed back to Hickle’s developer.)

It worked! Well, at least for kitti-train.py. I’ve got it running in the background as I type. This laptop only has a very wimpy GPU (GeForce 920M) and it took a couple of tweaks to prevent near-immediate out of memory errors:

export TF_CUDNN_WORKSPACE_LIMIT_IN_MB=100

kitty_train.py, line 35
batch_size = 2 #was 4

It’s taken about an hour to get to epoch 2/150, but I did renice Python way down so I could get on with other things.

Seismic Data

I’ve also spent a couple of hours on the (seismic) data-collecting code. I’d foolishly started coding around this using Javascript/node, simply because it was the last language I’d done anything similar with. I’ve got very close to having it gather & filter blocks of from the INGV service and dump to (csv) file. But I reckon I’ll just ditch that and recode it in Python, so I can dump to HDF5 directly – it does seem a popular format around the Deep Learning community.

Radio Data

Yes, that to think about too.

My gut feeling is that applying Deep Learning to the seismic data alone is likely to be somewhat useful for predictions. From what I’ve read, the current approaches being taken (in Italy at least) are effectively along these lines, leaning towards traditional statistical techniques. No doubt some folks are applying Deep Learning to the problem. But I’m hoping that bringing in radio precursors will make a major difference in prediction accuracy.

So far I have in mind generating spectrograms from the VLF/ELF signals. Which gives a series of images…sound familiar? However, I suspect that there won’t be quantitatively all that much information coming from this source (though qualitatively, I’m assuming vital).  As a provisional plan I’m thinking of pushing it through a few convnet/pooling layers to get the dimensionality way down, then adding that data as another input to the  PredNet.

Epoch 3/150 – woo-hoo!

PS.

It was taking way too long for my patience, so I changed the parameters a bit more:

nb_epoch = 50 # was 150
batch_size = 2 # was 4
samples_per_epoch = 250 # was 500
N_seq_val = 100 # number of sequences to use for validation

It took ~20 hours to train. For kitti_evaluate.py, it has produced some results, but also exited with an error code. Am a bit too tired to look into it now, but am very pleased to get a bunch of these:

 

 

 

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Author: Danny Ayers

Web research and development, music geek, woodcarver. Originally from rural northern England, now based in rural northern Italy.

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