Happy New Year!

A good time to take stock, huddled in front of the fire.

Boo!

As is often the case, I’ve been moving more slowly on this project than I’d have liked. Lack of resources is a continuing problem, but my own tendency to procrastinate has been by far the biggest obstacle to progress. On top of this, my main dev computer packed up recently, so until I can get that fixed or replaced I’m getting things set up again on an old laptop. Frustrating.

Three Steps Forward…

My strategy of taking a multi-pronged approach has had its pros and cons. I’ve got a prototype VLF receiver mostly built and have spent quite a lot of time playing around with Arduinos and related devices. On the software side – which is really the novel aspect of this project – I did make reasonable progress, getting together a provisional system design and some of the implementation. But then stalled. My desire to build hardware to allow local data collection has been something of a distraction, when there’s nothing stopping me from working with data from INGV and VLF.it.

Plans.

Looking ahead, I really need to reboot myself on the software dev. The ultimate target for running code will be nothing more sophisticated than this laptop. But for exploring algorithms and probably NN training, pre-optimisation, I reckon using cloud services will be my best bet. Concurrently I can look at some of the side prongs that I want to include in the system as a whole – notably web publication of data and automatic generation of Twitter notifications.

As everyone that’s worked on a solo project knows, I’ve also got a lot more material in my head or at best sketched in notebooks that needs writing up. How often has the New Year Resolution been : “Write more docs.”.

Mini-Seismograph

On the hardware side, until I’ve got my income a bit better sorted out I am pretty much limited to rather a scattergun approach using what ever components I have at hand. As well as finishing off the mostly-built VLF receiver, I’ve also got the bits for a basic seismograph. It’ll essentially be :

  •  ESP32microcontroller + comms :  core of the subsystem, handling the acquisition and preprocessing of data, which it will expose using a basic web server, accessible from the local network (the ESP32 includes WiFi connectivity).
  • MPU6050sensors : accelerometer +gyroscope : a tiny MEMS device, connected over I2C.
  • MicroSD carddata logging : experience shows that 100% connectivity is implausible, so some local history is very desirable
  • Tiny RTC cardrealtime clock :  the comms will be async, so accurate local timestamps are a must.

The ESP32 is a remarkably capable little device and I’m reasonably confident of the viability of interfacing the peripherals. Hopefully just a matter of plodding through example code for each, tweaking as needed.

The MPU6050 sensors are much less sensitive than those of typical seismometers. Only events with significant magnitude are likely to be detectable. It remains to be seen, but I have my suspicions that having 2 different types of sensor in there mean it will, with a bit of wrangling, be possible to get more effective sensitivity than the individual sensor data would yield. Whatever, once the wiring and code is in place for this setup, it should be trivial to extend it to use a more sensitive sensor. (Note the Raspberry Shake 4D configuration.)

Also…

I’ve got a little tangential project on the go. ELFQuake is in essence about trying to model aspects of a physical system : Earth geology and its electronically-detectable artifacts. Creating an analogue in software that captures enough to be able to make useful predictions. Also I’m increasingly convinced that the design of analog circuits between the sensors and standard data acquisition elements (ADCs etc) will have a major impact on the potential success of the system. Putting these points together, it shouldn’t seem that off the wall that I’ve been working on the design of an analog computer. (I must admit I also want to play with chaotic systems, this is something I’ve been messing about with for years).

 

 

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Author: Danny Ayers

Web research and development, music geek, woodcarver. Originally from rural northern England, now based in rural northern Italy.

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